Montreal and me \\ Montréal et moi

exeko

Montreal and me \\ Montréal et moi

Jeudi le 7 mars dernier, Katherine et Simon, médiatrices à Exeko (il faut bien que le féminin l'emporte lors de la journée internationale des droits des femme), étaient au Projet Autochtone Québec . Elles y ont passé deux heures à discuter de l'histoire des femmes. Ce qu'elles cherchaient n'étaient pas de relire l'histoire des grandes femmes que l'on trouve déjà dans les livres mais plutôt d'écrire l'histoire de toutes ces grandes femmes qui nous entoure mais qui n'ont pas encore leur livre à elles. Joel et Julie ont bien voulu que l'on partage ce qu'elles nous ont raconté... sur leurs mamans! Voici un témoignage de Julie Murphy, bénévole.

"J'aimerais la remercier pour m'avoir mis au monde.Elle est tendre, gentille, drôle et douce.C'est une passion de la rencontrer ma mère. Elle est né à Wemotaci, à une heure de La Tuque."

 Joël, parlant de sa mère, Gisèle

"Elle est généreuse, blagueuse, merveilleuse. Elle est protectrice, réfléchie, très intelligente."

Julie, parlant de sa mère, Colleen

 

This is my first time in Montréal. I hail from Canada’s West and I recently had the chance to volunteer with Exeko - an experience I am grateful for because it allowed me a unique glimpse into what Quebec can do. I was not expecting to head back to the Prairies with such meaningful connections made from only two treks as a volunteer, yet here I am reflecting back on my time as part of the Exeko crew, and I can’t help but feel a little more enriched as I return.

Over the past two weeks, I had the privilege of joining Exeko mediators on two visits to the PAQ. I participated as a volunteer under the leadership of Simon Chalifoux and guidance of Katherine Lapalme, and was made to feel part of the team right away. This was beneficial because it was clear upon entering the facility that the inhabitants of the shelter did not know the difference between employees and volunteers- we were welcomed into their dining area as a unit and I continued to be embraced as a fully-fledged member of the Exeko team.

Upon entering their space, I was immediately invited to a place at their table and offered a beverage and food by one inhabitant who seemed enthusiastic to make me feel comfortable there. Later, I had the honour of being offered a piece of Arctic Char - a delicacy among Aboriginal cultures, as I understand it - and a place to eat it among those who were feasting on it (right there in the middle of the cafeteria.) I was pleasantly surprised by how swiftly we were welcomed, and how the inhabitants warmly greeted us knowing we were from Exeko (one woman asked if we were “Exeko” and when I replied “yes” she smiled at me.) It became obvious to me that Exeko had a reputation at this place and it seemed like a positive one.

We came with an abundance of activities to engage people with, and this gave me a chance to meet people that I was not directly associating with throughout the evening. It was fascinating to see how popular the writing pads and utensils were, and how seemingly plain objects or questions sparked in-depth discussions and stories between our team and those at the shelter. I was delighted that one inhabitant was eager to tell me where he was from, citing geography of the Montréal and Quebec area and how it related to where his family was from.

From there, our talks ventured into details about his family, his upbringing, and his home away from the shelter. And he was just as enthusiastic to share stories about himself as he was interested in learning about me. He wanted to know who I was, where I came from, and what my experiences in Montreal had been so far. He remained invested in me and proceeded to teach me how to speak in French (which I am slowly starting to learn) - even using the newspaper’s horoscope, at one point, as a tool to do so. And for the rest of the night he remained committed to helping me embrace the French language to the best of his abilities. This led to him and I often recruiting the other Exeko team members and other inhabitants of the shelter to act as translators for us, and this in turn spawned more discussions and even some laughs.

One of my favourite moments was when a humourous question was posed to me and everyone at our table turned and waited for my response. Then suddenly, seemingly out of nowhere, a woman in the shelter cafeteria seated away from us answered in my place and her answer was hysterical. We all erupted in laughter. She had been on the periphery of our table area, turned and facing a different way and apart from us, and yet she had been listening the whole time! She had chosen to participate in our discussions at a distance and chimed in with perfect comedic timing.

Those of us gathered around the table filled the rest of the evening with endless chatter- personal stories, jokes, and making good fun out of the language barriers that existed in varying levels among us. One person shared a video of their Aboriginal group’s musical performance they had previously been a part of. It felt special that this person had shared such a personal part of their life with us and it was eye-opening to see an example of the artistic expression of their culture. Another person silently observed us (our team and those at the shelter we were talking to throughout the night) and depicted us all in a detailed graphite sketch. The artist surprised us with the sketch at the end of our visit and gave it to us, the Exeko team, to keep as a gift. A surge of pride ran through me when I looked and saw myself in the drawing - to have been worthy enough to have been included in the image they spent an hour creating was a beautiful finale to my final night with Exeko.

I had gone into this experience hoping to make the inhabitants of the shelter feel more included in the world, but as it turned out, it was me that they had made feel more included in theirs. I was warmly embraced by most especially the one, keen inhabitant who took a special interest in me, and this allowed me to get to know him, his community there, and thus life inside the shelter a little bit better. I have come to better appreciate what life looks like for people in situations like his, and the hard work that Exeko does in trying to build meaningful relationships and experiences with people that both parties may not otherwise have the chance to make together.

This fellow and I had gotten to know each other more in-depth than how a typical two-hour conversation between strangers may usually go, and it is this kind of connection that does not leave me easily as I head back west. I was proud of my ability to manage myself in a new space in a city that was unfamiliar to me, under the helpful counsel of the mediators, and I thank Exeko for being a gateway into making these connections that I otherwise would not have had during my time here in Montréal - that is, connections I gained with their field facilitators and inclusivity with the members of the shelter. I would gladly volunteer with Exeko again and give all who reside in PAQ my very best.

\\

C'est la première fois que je viens à Montréal. Je suis originaire de l'Ouest canadien et j'ai récemment eu la chance de faire du bénévolat avec Exeko - une expérience dont je suis reconnaissante puisqu'elle m'a permis d'avoir un aperçu unique de ce que le Québec peut faire. Je ne m'attendais pas de retourner dans les Prairies avec des liens aussi importants établis à partir de seulement deux sorties en tant que bénévole, mais je me souviens du temps que j'ai passé au sein de l'équipe Exeko, et je ne peux m'empêcher de me sentir un peu plus enrichie à mon retour.

Au cours des deux dernières semaines, j'ai eu le privilège de me joindre aux médiateurs et médiatrices d'Exeko pour deux visites au PAQ (Projet Autochtone du Québec). J'ai participé à des ateliers comme bénévole avec Simon Chalifoux et Katherine Lapalme, et j'ai tout de suite senti que je faisais partie de l'équipe. Ceci était bénéfique caril était clair qu’à notre arrivée dans l'établissement, les résidents du refuge ne connaissaient pas la différence entre les employé.e.s et les bénévoles - nous avons été accueilli.e.s dans leur salle à manger comme une unité et j'ai continué à être accueillie comme une membre à part entière de l'équipe Exeko.

En entrant dans leur espace, j'ai été immédiatement invitée à prendre place à leur table et un monsieur qui semblait enthousiaste m'a offert une boisson et de la nourriture pour me mettre plus à l'aise. Quelques instants plus tard, j'ai eu l'honneur de me voir offrir un morceau d'omble de l’Arctique - un délice parmi les cultures autochtones, si j'ai bien compris - et un endroit pour le manger entouré de ceux qui s'en régalaient (juste là au milieu de la cafétéria.) J'ai été agréablement surprise de la rapidité avec laquelle on nous a accueilli.e.s et de la chaleur avec laquelle les personnes présentes nous ont reçu en sachant que nous étions d’Exeko (une femme m’a demandé si nous étions "Exeko" et lorsque je lui répondis "oui" elle m’a sourit). Il m'est apparu évident qu'Exeko avait une réputation à cet endroit et cela m'a semblé être une réputation positive.

Nous sommes venu.e.s avec beaucoup d'activités pour engager les gens, et cela m'a donné l'occasion de rencontrer des gens avec lesquels je n'ai pas été directement en contact tout au long de la soirée. C'était fascinant de voir à quel point les blocs-notes et le matériel à dessin étaient appréciés, et à quel point des objets ou des questions apparemment simples suscitaient des discussions et des histoires en profondeur entre notre équipe et les membres du refuge. J'étais ravie que l’un des participant à l’atelier ait voulu me dire d'où il venait, citant la géographie de la région de Montréal et de Québec et comment elle était liée à l’origine géographique de sa famille.

De là, nos discussions se sont aventurées dans les détails au sujet de sa famille, de son éducation et de sa maison loin du refuge. Et il était tout aussi enthousiaste à l'idée de partager des histoires à son sujet qu'il était intéressé à apprendre davantage sur moi. Il voulait savoir qui j'étais, d'où je venais et quelles avaient été mes expériences à Montréal jusqu'à date. Il a continué à s'investir envers moi et m'a stimulé dans mon apprentissage du français (ce que je commence lentement à apprendre) - même en utilisant l'horoscope du journal, à un moment donné, comme un outil pour le faire. Et pour le reste de la soirée, il est resté déterminé à m'aider à embrasser la langue française du mieux qu'il le pouvait. Cela nous a amené, lui et moi, à interpeller souvent d'autres membres de l'équipe d’Exeko et d'autres personnes présentes au refuge pour servir de traducteurs pour nous, ce qui a donné lieu à d'autres discussions et même à des rires.

L'un de mes moments préférés a été lorsqu'une question drôle m'a été posée et que tout le monde à notre table s'est retourné et attendait ma réponse. Soudainement, de nulle part, une femme de la cafétéria, assise loin de nous, a répondu à ma place et sa réponse était quasi hystérique. Nous avons tous éclaté de rire. Elle était en retrait depuis le début de la conversation, en périphérie de notre table, de dos regardant ailleurs, et pourtant elle écoutait tout au long ! Elle avait choisi de participer à nos discussions à distance et de sonner avec un timing comique parfait.

Ceux et celles  d'entre nous qui étaient réuni.e.s autour de la table ont rempli le reste de la soirée d'interminables bavardages, d'histoires personnelles, de blagues et d'amusement pour surmonter les barrières linguistiques qui existaient à différents niveaux parmi nous. Une personne a partagé une vidéo de la prestation musicale de son groupe autochtone dans laquelle elle avait participé auparavant. C'était spécial que cette personne ait partagé avec nous une partie si personnelle de sa vie et cela m'a ouvert les yeux de voir un exemple de l'expression artistique de cette culture. Une autre personne nous a observé silencieusement (notre équipe et les personnes au refuge auxquelles nous avons parlé toute la soirée) et nous a tous et toutes représenté.e.s dans un croquis détaillé au graphite (ci-dessous). L'artiste nous a surpris avec l'esquisse à la fin de notre visite et nous l'a donnée, à nous, l'équipe d’Exeko, en cadeau. Une vague de fierté m'a traversée quand je l’ai regardé et que je me suis vu dans le dessin - le fait d'avoir été assez méritante pour être incluse dans l'image qu'il avait passé une heure à créer fut une belle finale  à ma dernière soirée avec Exeko.

J'avais fait cette expérience dans l'espoir de faire en sorte que les résidents du refuge se sentent plus incluses dans le monde, mais il s'est avéré que c'est moi qu'il.elle.s ont fait sentir plus incluse dans le leur. J'ai été chaleureusement accueillie par la personne la plus enthousiaste qui s'est intéressée particulièrement à moi, ce qui m'a permis de mieux le connaître, lui et sa communauté, et donc de vivre un peu mieux à l'intérieur du refuge. J'en suis venue à mieux comprendre à quoi ressemble la vie des gens dans des situations comme la sienne et le travail qu'Exeko fait pour essayer de construire des relations et des expériences significatives avec des gens dont les deux parties n'auraient peut-être pas eu la chance de faire ensemble autrement.

Cet homme et moi avons appris à nous connaître plus en profondeur qu'une conversation typique de deux heures entre étrangers, et c'est ce genre de connexion qui me laisse pétulante quand je retourne dans l'Ouest. J'étais fière de ma capacité à me débrouiller dans un nouvel espace dans une ville qui ne m'était pas familière, sous les conseils utiles des médiateur.trice.s, et je remercie Exeko d'avoir été une porte d'entrée pour établir ces liens que je n'aurais pas eut autrement pendant mon séjour ici à Montréal - c'est-à-dire les liens que j'ai établis avec les animatrices et les membres du refuge. Je serais heureuse de faire à nouveau du bénévolat avec Exeko et de donner le meilleur de moi-même à tous ceux qui résident au PAQ.

Julie Murphy

Cela fait plus d’un mois que j’ai intégré l’équipe d’Exeko à titre d’agente de recherche et déjà, je m’y sens un peu comme chez moi. L’équipe de...

Les camps de Leadership sont des intensifs de six jours durant lesquels entre 30 et 40 jeunes se réunissent pour une panoplie d’activités sur le...

Edgard, c’est un petit garçon qui se déguise tous les jours, c’est vraiment un petit garçon pas comme les autres, plein de surprises, tout un...

Tu n’as pas peur d’embarquer avec une organisation toujours en mouvement prête à te dessiner une place sur mesure? L’idée de t’investir aux...

  • « By engaging with people on a deep level, we see Exeko reinvigorating individual spirit to rebuild society in a new way. Exeko's work is not about small projects, but about achieving full social inclusion at a systemic level. [...] we believe that Exeko will reach a level of systemic impact with Quebec, Canada and the world within 5-10 years. »

    Elisha Muskat, Executive Director, Ashoka Canada

  • « Its goal? To develop reasoning, critical thinking, logic, and increase citizen participation of these marginalized groups. »

    Caroline Monpetit, Le Devoir (free translation)

  • «  I write my thoughts in my head, not on paper, and my thought is not lost. »

    Participant @PACQ

  • « Why use paper when it is as beautiful as this? »

    One of the co-creator for Métissage Urbain

  • « I Have my own identity ! »

    Putulik, Inuit participant, Métissage Urbain

  • « It is terrible for a society to ignore people with such talent! »

    Hélène-Elise Blais, les Muses about ART and ID projects

  • « Art has the advantage to make people talk about abilities rather than limitations, when confronted with an intellectual disability.  »

    Delphine Ragon, Community Programs Manager, Les Compagnons de Montréal

  • « Over the past few years, we have been seeing more and more high quality productions by people with an intellectual disability who truly are artists.  »

    Julie Laloire @AMDI

  • « Exeko implements creative solutions to several problematic, gives a voice to those we don't hear and hope to the underprivileged. »

    Bulletin des YMCA

  • « Its goal? To develop reasoning, critical thinking, logic, and increase citizen participation of these marginalized groups. »

    Caroline Monpetit, Le Devoir (free translation)

  • « ...empowering the children, and giving them confidence »

    APTN National News

  • « It’s a great program for children to learn about their traditions and to increase their interaction with Elders in the community. »

    Erika Eagle, Social Development Assistant with Waswanipi Brighter Future

  • « We are not higher, we are not lower, we are equal. »

    Simeoni, participant idAction Mobile

  • « Receving is good, but giving is better »

    Participant idAction@Kanesatake

  • « They're both people. We're not looking enough after people with problems, and mostly with mental health issues. Then we would have more people able to work. »

    Participant, idAction@Accueil Bonneau

  • « What better way to strengthen intergenerational ties? [...] A meeting between peers, a place for expression, learning and recovery »

    Chantal Potvin, reporter at Innuvelle

  • «  I don't know everything, but while reading it, it always bring me one step closer »

    A participant, idAction Mobile

  • «  By engaging with people on a deep level, we see Exeko reinvigorating individual spirit to rebuild society in a new way. Exeko's work is not about small projects, but about achieving full social inclusion at a systemic level. [...] we believe that Exeko will reach a level of systemic impact with Quebec, Canada and the world within 5-10 years. »

    Elisha Muskat, Executive Director, Ashoka Canada

  • «  ...empowering the children, and giving them confidence »

    APTN National News

  • «  I was completely alone today, thanks for talking to me »

    Elie, participant @idAction Mobile

  • «  They're both people. We're not looking enough after people with problems, and mostly with mental health issues. Then we would have more people able to work. »

    Participant, idAction@Accueil Bonneau

  • «  Today, the power acquired through knowledge is more far-reaching than knowledge itself. »

    André Frossard

  • « By engaging with people on a deep level, we see Exeko reinvigorating individual spirit to rebuild society in a new way. Exeko's work is not about small projects, but about achieving full social inclusion at a systemic level. [...] we believe that Exeko will reach a level of systemic impact with Quebec, Canada and the world within 5-10 years.»
    Elisha Muskat, Executive Director, Ashoka Canada
  • « Exeko implements creative solutions to several problematic, gives a voice to those we don't hear and hope to the underprivileged.»
    Bulletin des YMCA
  • « Over the past few years, we have been seeing more and more high quality productions by people with an intellectual disability who truly are artists. »
    Julie Laloire @AMDI
  • « Art has the advantage to make people talk about abilities rather than limitations, when confronted with an intellectual disability. »
    Delphine Ragon, Community Programs Manager, Les Compagnons de Montréal
  • « It is terrible for a society to ignore people with such talent!»
    Hélène-Elise Blais, les Muses about ART and ID projects
  • « I Have my own identity !»
    Putulik, Inuit participant, Métissage Urbain
  • « Why use paper when it is as beautiful as this?»
    One of the co-creator for Métissage Urbain
  • « I write my thoughts in my head, not on paper, and my thought is not lost.»
    Participant @PACQ
  • « Its goal? To develop reasoning, critical thinking, logic, and increase citizen participation of these marginalized groups.»
    Caroline Monpetit, Le Devoir (free translation)
  • « Its goal? To develop reasoning, critical thinking, logic, and increase citizen participation of these marginalized groups.»
    Caroline Monpetit, Le Devoir (free translation)
  • « Today, the power acquired through knowledge is more far-reaching than knowledge itself.»
    André Frossard
  • « They're both people. We're not looking enough after people with problems, and mostly with mental health issues. Then we would have more people able to work.»
    Participant, idAction@Accueil Bonneau
  • « They're both people. We're not looking enough after people with problems, and mostly with mental health issues. Then we would have more people able to work.»
    Participant, idAction@Accueil Bonneau
  • « We are not higher, we are not lower, we are equal.»
    Simeoni, participant idAction Mobile
  • « I was completely alone today, thanks for talking to me»
    Elie, participant @idAction Mobile
  • « Receving is good, but giving is better»
  • « What better way to strengthen intergenerational ties? [...] A meeting between peers, a place for expression, learning and recovery»
    Chantal Potvin, reporter at Innuvelle
  • «  ...empowering the children, and giving them confidence»
    APTN National News
  • « By engaging with people on a deep level, we see Exeko reinvigorating individual spirit to rebuild society in a new way. Exeko's work is not about small projects, but about achieving full social inclusion at a systemic level. [...] we believe that Exeko will reach a level of systemic impact with Quebec, Canada and the world within 5-10 years.»
    Elisha Muskat, Executive Director, Ashoka Canada
  • « It’s a great program for children to learn about their traditions and to increase their interaction with Elders in the community.»
    Erika Eagle, Social Development Assistant with Waswanipi Brighter Future
  • « ...empowering the children, and giving them confidence»
    APTN National News